AI systems in clinical practice

Laboratory systems
PEIRS
Pathology Expert Interpretative Reporting System
System for interpreting chemical pathology reports

developed by clinical domains keywords
Dept. of Medical Computer Science, University of Vienna Pathology Expert systems, Ripple Down Rules, knowledge acquisition, knowledge maintenance
location commissioned status
Department of Chemical Pathology, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney May 1991 Decommissioned 1994 when a new hospital information system was installed.
description
PEIRS appends interpretative comments to pathology reports. The knowledge aqusition strategy is the Ripple Down Rules method, which has allowed a pathologist to build over 2300 rules without knowledge engineering or programming support. New rules are added in minutes, and maintenance tasks are a trivial extension to the pathologist's routine duties. PEIRS commented on about 100 reports/day. Domains covered include thyroid function tests, arterial blood gases, glucose tolerance tests, hCG, catecholamines and a range of other hormones.

references
Edwards G, Compton P, Malor R, Srinivasan A, Lazarus L. PEIRS: a pathologist maintained expert system for the interpretation of chemical pathology reports. Pathology 1993;25:27-34 " "
Compton P, Edwards G, Srinivasan A, Malor R, Preston P, Kang B, Lazarus, L. Ripple down rules: turning knowledge acquisition into knowledge maintenance. Artificial Intelligence in Medicine 1992;4(6):463-475 " "
Compton P. A philosophical basis for knowledge acquisition. Knowledge Acquisition 1990;2:241-257. " "

contact links
Department of Chemical Pathology
St Vincent's Hospital
Sydney
New South Wales
Australia

 bullet  Ripple Down Rules
acknowledgements

Archive of AI systems in clinical practice previously administered by Enrico Coiera. Used with permission. Maintained and extended since 2001 by OpenClinical.

Entry on archive: October 27 1995
Last main update: October 27 1995
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